When you are on a safari you see a number of animals of the same species, commonly referred to as a “group”. While this is not wrong, most groups of animals actually have their own collective names.

Among African animals, you will find a journey or tower of giraffes, a parade of elephants, a leap of leopards and so much more. The same applies to a group of rhinos, often referred to as a “crash”. This name becomes rather fitting when you see them charging through the savannah.

So next time your ranger asks “what is a group of rhinos called?”, you’ll know the answer. To wow them even more, check out these collective nouns for African animals as well as the interesting rhino facts to follow.

So is it a Herd of Rhinos?

Crash of seven white rhinos crossing the road

While a herd broadly describes a large group of animals that lives together, it refers more specifically to animals with hooves. These animals include zebra, springbok, Cape buffalo, impala, and many more.

Rhinos are in fact odd-toed hoofed mammals with three toes on each foot. This refers to animals with one or three toes on each foot. Similarly, there are even-toed hoofed mammals who have two or four toes on each foot.

The hooves on a mammal’s feet allow it to run faster. Also, most hoofed animals are plant-eaters found in open habitats such as grasslands.

A Crash of Rhinos is Also Known As?

Along with crash, another unique collective noun for a rhino is a stubbornness. While the term crash certainly is the most fitting, the adjective stubborn is not far off the mark either.

Rhinos are often described as being stubborn creatures as they are not always willing to cooperate. The same goes for elephants, but the rhinoceros still takes the cake.

Often they do not agree that elephants are the top mammal in the pecking order at the waterhole. As such, rhinos and elephants often get into fights as one will not make room for the other.

Rhinos are not the most social creatures. They aren’t too fond of hanging out with other animals, however, they have a few bird friends like the yellow-billed oxpecker. Also known as “tick birds”, oxpeckers eat away all the ticks that bother the rhino and are often seen riding on the large animal’s back.

Rhino Crash Facts

While you now vaguely have the answer to the question – “what is a group of rhinoceros called?” – there are many other interesting facts that are worth knowing.

To support the conservation of these beautiful creatures, check out Save the Rhino.

Rhino full name

White rhino grazing, featuring its beautiful horns

The name “rhinoceros” is derived from the Greek words meaning “nose-horn”. This is fitting given that a rhino’s most outstanding feature is its large keratin-sheathed horn (two horns for some species), which sprouts from the middle of its face. The full scientific name for this truly unique animal is rhinocerotidae.

Species: the different groups of rhinos names

Native to Africa and Asia are five species of rhinos, each with their own unique charms and quirks. These species include:

Black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)

Karanja the black rhino in Masai Mara, Kenya

The black rhinos are known for their triangular upper lip which is useful for eating foliage. While these beautiful creatures once roamed freely throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa, they are now critically endangered.

White rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum)

The name “white rhino” is not as accurate as we think and is actually derived from the word wyd (wide), describing their square lips. This is the largest rhino species and is native to Africa.

While the Southern white rhino has managed to rebound from the brink of extinction, the Northern white rhino is functionally extinct after the last male died in 2018.

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)

Sumatran rhinoceros portrait, munching on some leaves

This critically endangered species of rhino is the only surviving representative of the Dicerorhinini – the most primitive rhinoceroses group which emerged in the Miocene about 20 million years ago. As such it has a rather prehistoric appearance, with hair which covers its entire body. It is also the smallest species of rhino in the world.

Javan rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus)

Another old species of rhino native to Asia is the Javan rhinoceros. They once roamed across Southeast Asia. Today, they are critically endangered and limited to a single nature preserve in Indonesia known as Ujung Kulon National Park.

Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis)

Indian rhinos in Kaziranga National Park, India

This is the largest species native to Asia and characterized by its distinctive single horn and body-armor like skin.

How fast can a rhino run?

If you’ve ever wondered how fast a rhino runs, the answer might surprise you. For such large animals, they are rather speedy and can run as fast as 55 km/h. In fact, they are the fastest mammals weighing over 1000 kilograms.

What’s even more interesting is that they are able to reach their top speed in just a few strides. As such, the last thing you want charging at you is one of these tanks as it’ll be tough to get out the way.

Bonus fact: Rhinos can only see as far as 30 feet ahead. This way they run together in confidence, charging across the savannah at full speed, even if they are not sure exactly what is in front of them.

So, a Group of Rhinoceroses is Called…

Herd of three white rhinos resting by a tree

Much like many other animals, especially those found in Africa, the rhinoceros has its own collective names. The three most common terms used to describe a group of rhinos are:

  • A crash – as they are often seen charging through the African savannah.
  • A herd – as they are a group of animals that live together and have three hoofed toes.
  • A stubbornness – as they are fairly stubborn creatures.

Regardless of which term you decide to use, it will be more than fitting. Take this, along with the other interesting facts mentioned, on your next safari adventure. Also, be sure to check out these amazing safari deals.